Psychologists

The Ph.D. and Psy.D. degrees are doctoral degrees in the filed of clinical or counseling psychology. Psychologists receive extensive training in the science and practice of psychology. Doctoral-level training prepares psychologists to conduct research as well as to provide a wide range of clinical services to individuals, couples, families, groups, and organizations.  (Source: American Psychological Association, Society of Clinical Psychology).
Doctoral degrees typically take 3-7 years to complete.

Neuropsychologists are psychologists (Ph.D. or Psy.D.) who received general training in psychology as well as specific training in neuropsychology, which emphasizes the brain’s cognitive functions, such as attention, language, and memory. (Source: University of Wisconsin).

Psychiatrists

A psychiatrist (M.D. or D.O.) is a medical doctor who specializes in mental health. Psychiatrists are qualified to assess both the mental and physical aspects of psychological problems and can prescribe medication. (Source: American Psychiatric Association)

Therapists & Social Workers

If someone is a “licensed therapist,” they may have a LMFT, LPCC, or LCSW degree. Marriage and Family Therapists (LMFT) and Licensed Professional Clinical Counselors (LPCC) use psychotherapeutic techniques to support individuals, couples, families, and groups. A Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) also works therapeutically with individuals, couples, families, and groups with an added emphasis on helping individuals and communities access resources. A licensed Educational Psychologist (LEP) or “School Psychologist” has a Master’s degree and focuses on educational evaluation, diagnosis of learning disorders, and educational counseling and consultation. (Source: Board of Behavioral Sciences).
Typically, to receive a Master’s degree, an individual completes a degree in 1-3 years.